Blog

Climate Change, Human Health, and National Advocacy: Former EPA Administrator Tells Us to Speak up

This spring, the Harvard Global Health Institute hosted a symposium entitled “Human Health in a Changing Climate” with series of panelists who spoke about the effects of changing environmental conditions on human health. The event’s keynote speaker was Gina McCarthy, Former Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under President Barack Obama.

McCarthy began the symposium by summarizing that what experts believe is responsible… Read more about Climate Change, Human Health, and National Advocacy: Former EPA Administrator Tells Us to Speak up

Strides in Solidarity

Bright and early on the morning of Sunday, April 9th, a group of Harvard students headed to the indoor Boston University Track and Tennis Center to participate in Strides in Solidarity, a 5K race or walk-a-thon to show solidarity with Partners in Health community health workers around the world. Partners in Health Engage teams from Harvard, Northeastern, Boston University, and Boston College, along with the PIH Young Professionals had spent weeks fundraising and spreading the word about this event.

Strides in Solidarity ran from 10:00AM to 1:00PM, and opening speakers included Joia… Read more about Strides in Solidarity

To Challenge the Status Quo: Staging a Teach-In on Access to Medicines

In mid-February the Harvard Financial Analysts Club invited Martin Shkreli to campus to give a talk on “healthcare and investing.” This worried a significant portion of Harvard students on many fronts. I write here from the perspective of the Global Health & AIDS Coalition (GHAC).

Martin Shkreli, perhaps better known as Pharma Bro, earned himself a mix of infamy and admiration after hiking the price of Daraprim– a drug used to treat toxoplasmosis (a symptom in immunocompromised patients) – from $13.50 to $750 overnight. Shkreli’s investing approach can be broken down quite simply… Read more about To Challenge the Status Quo: Staging a Teach-In on Access to Medicines

Medical deserts in America: Why we need to advocate for rural healthcare

In July 2015, H.R. 3225, the Save Rural Hospitals Act, was introduced in the House of Representatives. The goal of this bill was to help stabilize rural hospitals through financial relief and to halt the recent healthcare spending cuts that had led to rural hospital closures across the nation. When sequestration and Medicare cuts began to hit hospitals, the rate of rural hospital closures increased six-fold between 2010 and 2015. Currently, 673 additional rural medical facilities are at risk of… Read more about Medical deserts in America: Why we need to advocate for rural healthcare

Hope and Vibrance are Alive Inside the "Refugee Crisis"

My first exposure to the “refugee crisis” was in the summer of 2013, just before my senior year of high school. I was in Istanbul visiting family and the Turkish nightly news was consumed with reports of increasing numbers fleeing the seemingly endless violence in Syria. Thousands were pouring across Turkey’s borders every day, and Turkey was not prepared for the neighboring civil war to spill over. Turkey did not have stringent border control at the time, and did not feel the need to instate it, as it was more of a crossroads for refugees to stay for a few months and gather the necessary… Read more about Hope and Vibrance are Alive Inside the "Refugee Crisis"

Student Activism: Perspectives on Tackling the Opioid Epidemic

Sometime in early November, we were sitting around a table in Adams Coolidge Room talking about the Long Island Bridge closure and its effects on the homeless population in Massachusetts, specifically in regards to the current opioid epidemic. Two years ago, the Long Island Bridge closed, displacing hundreds of homeless persons relying on the shelters and detox centers on the island. Some of those beds have yet to be relocated.

Read more about Student Activism: Perspectives on Tackling the Opioid Epidemic

Hope in the Face of a Disaster: standing together after Hurricane Matthew

In October, Hurricane Matthew struck regions of southern Haiti as well as St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic. In Haiti, the death toll surpassed 1,000; the hurricane displaced hundreds of thousands and left over 1 million people in the south in need of urgent humanitarian assistance. Many were left without homes, access to safe drinking water, food, or medical attention. Medical and public health professionals feared that another cholera crisis was imminent.

Three thousand miles away, students at Harvard whose families or friends had been affected by the… Read more about Hope in the Face of a Disaster: standing together after Hurricane Matthew

Los Dos Caras (Two Faces)

Some content from this blog originally appeared on the Rosenkrantz Discovery Blog 2016.

This summer, myself and a classmate had the incredible opportunity to perform self-guided research abroad as recipients of the Rosenkrantz Discovery Grant offered by the History and Science Department. We chose to explore the culture of medicine in Havana, Cuba:

We touched down in Jose Marti airport in the afternoon and walked off the plane into the hot and humid Havana air. On our ride along the Autopista… Read more about Los Dos Caras (Two Faces)

HGHI Summer Internship Reflections: Harvard University Center for AIDS Research, Henna Hundal, '19

My work with the lovely Ms. Wanda Allen of Harvard University Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) has given me unbelievable insight into the intersection of research and community engagement. From the very first day, the brilliant, energetic group at CFAR welcomed me and my Harvard College colleague Laura Kanji with open arms. More than just office supervisors, these individuals have become true mentors -- helping us navigate the triumphs and challenges of running a research project, dispensing valuable career advice… Read more about HGHI Summer Internship Reflections: Harvard University Center for AIDS Research, Henna Hundal, '19