FEATURED STORY | Incubator

Fighting Misinformation: The Preprint Sifter

The Preprint Sifter is a new Twitter tool that tracks down Tweets from leading epidemiologists, virologists, public health and other experts who are posting, vetting and verifying COVID-19 related preprint papers.

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Health Systems Archive

Housing and Health: What Does the Literature Tell Us?

By Kate Raphael It is well documented that housing is closely associated with health. The location, condition, and context of where we live intersect many factors that indirectly affect health. Our housing literally encompass environmental (think: dust and exposure to the elements) and social factors (think: isolation and crime) that directly affect health. A person experiencing Continue reading [...]

Education and Health: What Does the Literature Tell Us?

By Kate Raphael Across many disciplines, greater educational attainment is closely associated with health. People who have obtained more schooling are significantly likelier to live longer, healthier lives. The mediating pathways that facilitate this connection are myriad and complex. A number of pathways have been proposed, including ones involving health literacy and behaviors, employment opportunities, and social and Continue reading [...]

Addressing Symptoms and Root Causes

The following is an interview with Kathy Ko Chin, MS, President and CEO of the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum, a national health justice organization which influences policy, mobilizes communities, and strengthens programs and organizations to improve the health of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. She’ll be speaking as a panelist at Continue reading [...]

Moving to Opportunity

This post, by Harold Pollack, was originally published on September 22, 2012 on The Incidental Economist. It is reposted with permission here. Dr. Pollack is the Helen Ross Professor of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. Over the past decade, he has conducted diverse studies and intervention trials to improve services to vulnerable individuals Continue reading [...]

Addressing SDOH in North Carolina

The following is an interview with Betsey Tilson, MD, MPH, Director and Chief Medical Officer for the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. She’ll be speaking as a panelist at our Cambridge meeting on December 2. Austin Frakt: Among health care systems, plans, and programs, there has been increasing discussion of, if not investment in, Continue reading [...]

Why aren’t facts enough?

By Luke Testa It seems intuitive that providing people with accurate health information will help them make better health decisions. But just providing information backed by research isn’t enough to change minds, let alone behavior. The way people engage with health information is more complicated than just consuming available scientific findings. Beliefs play a major Continue reading [...]

The Value of our Health Care Dollars

The following is an interview with Daniel Polsky, PhD, MPP, Distinguished Professor of Health Economics at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. Austin Frakt: To what extent should the health system be involved in addressing social needs? After all, these are not traditionally in the purview of health care. Are the boundaries of health Continue reading [...]

Health as the means, not the end

The following is an interview with Sandro Galea, PhD, physician, epidemiologist, author, and dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. Austin Frakt: Among health care systems, plans, and programs, there has been increasing discussion of, if not investment in, approaches to addressing social needs. What is driving this phenomenon? Continue reading [...]