FEATURED STORY | Incubator

Fighting Misinformation: The Preprint Sifter

The Preprint Sifter is a new Twitter tool that tracks down Tweets from leading epidemiologists, virologists, public health and other experts who are posting, vetting and verifying COVID-19 related preprint papers.

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Gender and Mental Health: Implications for Global Mental Health Delivery in Compañeros En Salud – Mexico

November 13, 2019

Event recap written by: Louisa Hudson MSc, Research Assistant, Department of Global Health & Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School Mercedes Aguerrebere, MD, MMSc brought to light insightful observations and questions around gender and mental health in Chiapas, Mexico. Dr. Aguerrebere is a physician working in comprehensive primary and mental health care. She has been working with Compañeros Continue reading [...]

The Value of our Health Care Dollars

November 7, 2019

The following is an interview with Daniel Polsky, PhD, MPP, Distinguished Professor of Health Economics at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. Austin Frakt: To what extent should the health system be involved in addressing social needs? After all, these are not traditionally in the purview of health care. Are the boundaries of health Continue reading [...]

Health as the means, not the end

November 4, 2019

The following is an interview with Sandro Galea, PhD, physician, epidemiologist, author, and dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. Austin Frakt: Among health care systems, plans, and programs, there has been increasing discussion of, if not investment in, approaches to addressing social needs. What is driving this phenomenon? Continue reading [...]

We have a terminology problem

October 28, 2019

By Austin Frakt The community of scholars (including some of us on this project) and the health care industry have been using “social determinants of health” to mean so many things that it has lost its original meaning. Sometimes precise definitions don’t matter too much if everyone knows what is meant from context. But I Continue reading [...]

Which Health Policies Work?

October 22, 2019

Considering how much money we spend on health care in the U.S., we might hope that we allocate a good chunk of it toward evaluating the impact of the health policies we have in place. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case. Austin Frakt explores U.S. health policy evaluation (or lack thereof) in one of his recent Continue reading [...]

The Price of Social Programs

October 16, 2019

By Kate Raphael In other blog posts, we’ve discussed U.S. health care spending and outcomes. In short, we spend a lot more on medical care than other high-income countries, yet our health outcomes are often worse. We also spend a lot of money on social programs, which have been shown to be associated with improved health outcomes. It makes Continue reading [...]